Try it, You’ll Like it!

April 8, 2014

I can’t believe it has been so long since I last wrote something for my blog. How quickly time flies!

It has been a crazy year. I have been consumed with getting our Waterpik® lunch and learn team off the ground. Yes, you heard me correctly; Water Pik is now providing lunch and learns in select locations around the country.

The dental hygienists (and a couple of dentists too) that are on the lunch and learn team are great to work with. I have enjoyed meeting all of them (even it was virtual in most cases) and most of all, I have been energized by hearing about how much they love the Water Flosser and by the stories that they have told me.

Here is one I heard yesterday. Like many dental professionals, this hygienist had tried the Water Flosser in the past but wasn’t a regular user. She was, however, a regular recommender – to people with ortho, implants, crown and bridge or perio. Like I used to be when I was in clinical practice and probably like many of you too.

But then she decided to try it again. Guess what? Now she is recommending it to everyone.

A lot of recommenders have never tried the Water Flosser and a lot of recommenders think it’s just for those patients with cleaning challenges.

And yet, don’t most patients face cleaning challenges……with flossing….most people exaggerate a little on how much they do it. And then there are those that actually do it; but never well enough to get a health benefit.

So, I have two suggestions. Try the Waterpik® Water Flosser again – you won’t be disappointed. Number two, book a lunch and learn.

Here are the locations where we are offering them: Atlanta, Austin, Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Dallas/Fort Worth, Daytona, Denver/Fort Collins, Detroit, Jacksonville, Las Vegas, Los Angeles/Orange County, Miami, New York City/Long Island/New Jersey, Norfolk, Portland, Richmond, Sacramento, San Antonio, San Diego, San Jose, Seattle, St Louis, Walnut Creek, Washington DC

Don’t see your city on the list? Here is where we are looking for dental hygienists to work as independent professional educators: Alexandria/Arlington, Baton Rouge, Buffalo, Charlotte, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Duluth, Fairfield County, CT, Houston, Indianapolis, Minneapolis, Nashville, New Orleans, Pasadena/San Gabriel, Philadelphia, Phoenix, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, San Mateo, Tucson

If you are interested in a lunch and learn or want to inquire about becoming a lunch and learn presenter, email me a cjahn@waterpik.com

Advertisements

Yes, the Waterpik Water Flosser Removes Plaque

March 22, 2013

Seriously, you might say? That isn’t what I learned in school. The same is true for me. In fact the only thing I learned in school about oral irrigation was that it didn’t remove plaque so there was no point in recommending it. It wasn’t until I was a practicing hygienist and had a patient who had starting using it and greatly improved his oral heath that I became more informed about the product and its benefits.

Where did this idea that the Water Flosser cannot remove plaque come from? My guess is that it has to do with the word ‘water.’ In school, we learn that plaque cannot be removed by simply swishing with water; mechanical action is required. This is true, and what makes the Water Flosser different is that it utilizes pulsation and pressure to deliver the water.

A 2009 study at USC found that a three-second application of pulsating water from the Waterpik® Water Flosser set at medium pressure removed 99.9% of plaque from the treated area. The researchers concluded that the study demonstrated that the hydraulic forces produced by the Water Flosser can remove plaque from tooth surfaces.

Recently, a study found that not only does the Water Flosser remove plaque, but it does it more effectively than string floss. Subjects abstained from all oral hygiene from 23-25 hours then used a manual toothbrush and either string floss or a Water Flosser. The people who used the Water Flosser had 29% better plaque removal. Looking at the approximal area, the Water Flosser beat floss again being 29% better.

The next time your patient complains they can’t, won’t, or don’t like to floss, recommend the Water Flosser. You and they will be pleasantly surprised!


Where the Jobs are

January 23, 2013

Carol_Tammi DHCH2013 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association recently hosted its second Dental Hygiene in a Changing World Conference. In attendance were around 200 dental hygienists from all across the country; many seeking information on how transition or tap into different types of career opportunities like public health, education, corporate positions, and entrepreneurship. It was exciting to see the energy and talent in the room, and it made me feel confident about the future of dental hygiene and proud that Water Pik, Inc was a corporate supporter of the event.

The economic downturn, an influx of new dental hygiene graduates along with people staying in the work force longer has led to a scarcity of clinical dental hygiene positions. This situation isn’t likely to improve any time soon. A study on dental income published in JADA in April 2012 found that there has been a decline in average real net income for dentists due to a decrease in the utilization of dental care. The decline actually started in 2006 prior to the recession leading the authors to speculate that income may not recover to prerecession levels.

One of the conference panel members, my friend Tammi Byrd told the group that she believes job growth will come from the public health sector and other alternative settings rather than the traditional brick and mortar dental offices. This startled the audience a little and left many asking what those jobs might be.

I don’t think we know the answer to that, yet, but I’m certain that several creative, talented, and energetic dental hygienists will figure it out and lead the way. Will you be one of them?